Strategic Intervention Papers (SIPs)

“Strategic Intervention Papers” (SIPs) are the flagship publication of the Global Ideas Center. They usually run between 2,000 and 4,000 words in length.

The purpose of each Strategic Intervention Paper (SIP) is twofold: First, to tackle a specific issue that impedes progress and, second, to promote a broader public debate on this issue in order to move it toward constructive resolution.

Each SIP starts out by pinpointing a specific policy challenge and then provides an honest account of the underlying causes as well as an evaluation of how specific actors need to change. Often, our SIPs address a specific problem or policy blockage within a country or region. Alternatively, they examine contentious issues in the relationship between a specific set of countries or regions.

Our SIPs typically identify potential solutions that have been implemented successfully elsewhere (the “example country”). This can be a political, economic, social or administrative practice. It could also be a law or regulation that has proven effective in the example country and that offers potential for adaptation in the target country.

Ultimately, our SIPs represent an attempt to assist countries in a better and more honest form of self-comprehension. We regard the readiness to do that as a critical step to help nations to live up to their domestic, regional and global responsibilities.

Strategic Assessment Memos (SAMs)

The other main publication of the Global Ideas Center are our Strategic Assessment Memos (SAMs). They offer media-ready quick takes on current hot-button discussion items on the global agenda. SAMs usually run between 800 and 1,200 words in length.

SAMs point out perspectives and ideas that are either overlooked or that need to be explored in an alternative framework to ensure a balanced global debate. They also pinpoint the rhetorical falseness of the positions promoted by prominent political leaders. All too often, the intention of the powers that be is to sell whatever their vested interests are as unassailable wisdom. In reality, that “wisdom” is neither unassailable nor wise, but often self-serving and short-sighted.

For the Global Ideas Center, tackling powerful interests and conventional wisdom is key to having an open, honest, educated and results-oriented debate.

In keeping with our overall promise and premise “The Power of Comparisons”, our SAM-style explorations will often involve cross-border perspectives and examples.